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Our young fans, particularly of the Samurai Detective Novels, have done some amazing videos (see this, this, and this for some examples — and of course the Lego stop motion version!) as they do virtual book reports and trailers for the book. Please upload your version to our Guest Book — we love to see these!!

Cover for Are You Prepared for the Storm of Lovemaking
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Are You Prepared for the Storm of Lovemaking

Are You Prepared for the Storm of Lovemaking

Releasing from Simon and Schuster 6-Feb-2024, Are You Prepared for the Storm of Lovemaking?

Barbara Bush was born on June 8, 1925. Both as vice-president’s wife and president’s wife, she was definitely her own woman. She had white hair that she stubbornly refused to dye, When people asked her about it, she would reply, "Why don’t people ask me about my brain instead of my hair?" She was an ardent promoter of literacy, and had a radio program, "Mrs. Bush’s Storytime," in which she read to children. Her book about her dog Millie became a best-seller. She persuaded her husband to sign the National Literacy Act of 1991, allowing it to become passed into law. She developed a friendship with Raisa Gorbacheva, the wife of the leader of the Soviet Union, tat helped smooth relations between the two countries. Image: Library Of Congress. Photoduplication Service, photographer. Barbara Bush reading to kids, 3/7/89. Washington D.C, . [3/7/89] Photograph. www.loc.gov/item/2017646194/. See MoreSee Less
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Ida McKinley, wife of President William McKinley, died on June 8, 1907. Her beauty and charm (and amazing taste in feathered headpieces!) made her an asset to McKinley’s political career, which won him a seat in the House of Representatives. Mckinley remained faithful to her, and when he was away on business trips, wrote her every day. A friend asked what he could find to write about, and Ida replied, "He can say he loves me.," After McKinley became President, an assassin shot him. He did not die right away and Ida pulled herself together to comfort him. She would tell him, "I want to go with you," and he replied, "We will eventually all go," When he died, she oversaw the construction of a mausoleum where they could be interred together in Canton, Ohio, their home town.Photo credit, Ida (Saxton) McKinley, 1847-1907, pictured ca. 1901. See MoreSee Less
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June 2 was a big day for First Ladies’ birthdays! Happy birthday, Martha Washington! She was born June 2 in 1731. Her father was a wealthy Virginia planter and it was only natural that she married a man like him–Daniel Parke Custis, almost twice her age. After giving birth to two childen by him, she became a widow. Her inheritance made her a prize "catch," and she chose George Washington, an officer in the colonial army as a second husband. They would have lived happily together, but when the colonists rebelled against Britain, George was selected to lead the rebel army. Every winter of the war, when fighting stopped, she joined the winter quarters and spent her time comforting the wounded and knitting clothing (socks, sweaters) for the men. A woman who had joined her said, "I never in my life knew a woman so busy from early morning until late at night." Later, when George became the new nation’s president, Abigail Adams, the wife of Washington’s vice-president, commented on Martha’s democratic demeanor: "I found myself much more deeply impressed than I ever did before their Majesties of Britain."(ca. 1904) Young Martha and George Washington. , ca. 1904. [St. Louis: publisher not transcribed] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/2018697445/. See MoreSee Less
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Happy Belated Birthday, Helen Taft! Helen Herron, who later married William Howard Taft, was born on June 2 in 1861. Her father had been the law partner of President Rutherford B. Hayes, who invited Helen and her family to visit the White House. Helen was so impressed that she decided to marry a man who was destined to be president. She started a salon where the young people she knew could discuss the burning issues of the day. She was impressed by William Howard Taft, even though he was a heavyweight physically–tipping the scales at around 350 pounds. Helen didn’t let that bother her, even though Taft’s ambition was to be a judge. He eventually accomplished both his goals and Helen’s. When he became president, Helen rode in the carriage taking him to the White House–the first time a First Lady had done that. Later, he accomplished his own goal when he became a Justice of the Supreme Court. Image: (ca. 1911) Helen Taft, full-length portrait, standing by fireplace, facing right. , ca. 1911. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/97505448/. See MoreSee Less
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Also, we were interviewed on CSPAN Book Notes, the podcast with CSPAN founder Brian Lamb! You can listen to our episode here: www.c-span.org/podcasts/subpage/?series=booknotesplus&episode=d27eb1aa-e216-11ee-a5be-7f1242837a2e See MoreSee Less
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